Author: Administrator

Newsletter – April 2021

On this Festival of Pesach to our friends in the Jewish community:
“Chag Kasher v’same’ach”
חַג כָּשֵׁר וְשָׂמֵחַ

Wishing a happy and kosher for-Passover holiday

And for those in the Western Christian Church in this coming Easter Season:
“Christ is risen!” – and the response – “He is risen indeed!”

And to our brothers and sisters in the Eastern Christian Church this April:
“Khristós anésti!” – and the response – “Alithós anésti!”


Holocaust Remembrance Day
(Yom HaShoah)
April 7 (sunset) to April 8 (sunset)

What is Yom HaShoah?
Yom HaShoah (יום השואה) and in English as Holocaust Remembrance Day, or Holocaust Day, is observed as Israel’s day of commemoration for the approximately six million Jews and five million others who perished in the Holocaust as a result of the actions carried out by Nazi Germany and its allies, and for the Jewish resistance in that period. In Israel, it is a national memorial day and a public holiday. It was inaugurated in 1953, anchored by a law signed by the Prime Minister of Israel David Ben-Gurion and the President of Israel Yitzhak Ben-Zvi.

Ways to remember Yom HaShoah
There are a number of things you can do on this day to remember, to learn, and to reflect. Go to the website below and look at the ways you can deepen your understanding of the Shoah. Most are free tours and events. For some events, there is a fee to participate.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/us-holocaust-memorial-museum-free-onlinevirtual-tour-via-zoom-tickets-110900207506

You are invited to recall survivors who came to Muskegon for our commemoration events and addressed the community and spoke at special learning events with area high school, sharing their recollections.
Light a candle in their memory.


The year 2020 brought with it a pandemic forcing many groups and institutions to cancel their programming. The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies-Muskegon was no different.

We were able to provide two events on ZOOM.
In January 2021, Karen Shawn, a professor of literature and writer of readers, play on the years leading up to the Holocaust. The play was done by students from Fruitport High School and faculty, under teacher Sarah Woycehoski. Karen then took questions from the viewers.

In March 2021, Irene Miller, a children survivor, shared her recollections on ZOOM and took questions. Her book, Into No-Man’s Land, is available through the Center. To get a copy, email your request to chgs.muskegon@gmail.com.

We are also providing funds for teachers to book a virtual tour of the Southeast Michigan Holocaust Center in Farmington Hills for their history or literature classes. Contact Mr. Tom Hicken at Muskegon Area Intermediate School District.

WE WOULD LIKE TO SAY THANK YOU to all those who supported the work of the Center through the Holiday Bread sale in December 2020. The format was different given the issues surrounding COVID, but the orders came. Our partnership with Annunciation Orthodox Church was really great and provided and wealth of taste.
Our deepest thanks to First Baptist Church who opened its kitchen doors to the bakers.

If you desire to support the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies – Muskegon, you may send your contribution to CHGS-Muskegon, PO Box 452, Muskegon MI 49440. Make your checks payable to
chgs-Muskegon/MCCC


Our primary fundraising event is Holiday Bread and Pastry.

This December the dates for pick-up will be December 4, 11, 18.

Information on bread and pastry will be posted in November and orders can be placed beginning November 14th. Our email is – holidaybreads@gmail.com

Remembering …